Photo 18 Sep 1 note My cover’s face is prettier than yours. Fall back, Wall.

My cover’s face is prettier than yours. Fall back, Wall.

Text 17 Sep 10 notes Diversity 101: Gay in YA

cbcdiversity:

Contributed to CBC Diversity by Adam Silvera

When writing diverse books, we’re writing about choices—and the things we can’t choose. Harry Potter could have chosen not to go to Hogwarts, but spending the rest of his youth with the incorrigible Dursleys would’ve sucked for all involved—Harry, the Dursleys, and the readers who became readers because of the boy wizard. Katniss Everdeen didn’t have to volunteer as tribute in The Hunger Games in place of Prim, but life in District 12 was bleak enough without watching someone act like her younger sister’s name wasn’t announced for a battle to the death. There are choices characters—and people—make because the alternative is simply unspeakable. But then there are the ones who don’t have a choice at all. They don’t choose to be Latino, they don’t choose mental illness, they don’t choose their sexual orientation. Who gives them a voice? I, along with many others, volunteer as tribute.

Read More

My post for the Children’s Book Council on writing GAY YA. 

Photo 17 Sep And the Children’s Book Council asked me to write a post about Diversity 101: Gay in YA, which ALSO went live today. Both can be found on Twitter. #weneeddiversebooks #morehappythannot

And the Children’s Book Council asked me to write a post about Diversity 101: Gay in YA, which ALSO went live today. Both can be found on Twitter. #weneeddiversebooks #morehappythannot

Photo 16 Sep 1 note I wrote SOMETHING for SOMEONE and used these books as favorite examples of novels that write LGBT characters right. You can read the post tomorrow afternoon. :)

I wrote SOMETHING for SOMEONE and used these books as favorite examples of novels that write LGBT characters right. You can read the post tomorrow afternoon. :)

Photo 16 Sep 13 notes heidischulz:

It’s here! It’s here!

heidischulz:

It’s here! It’s here!

(Source: kayepublicity)

Photo 13 Sep The #AddisonStone launch was BADASS. Congrats, @adelegriffin and Soho!

The #AddisonStone launch was BADASS. Congrats, @adelegriffin and Soho!

Photo 12 Sep I love @beckyalbertalli. Signed ARC of #SimonVs + a pack of Golden Oreos. (That’s what the Post-it is for.)

I love @beckyalbertalli. Signed ARC of #SimonVs + a pack of Golden Oreos. (That’s what the Post-it is for.)

Photo 10 Sep Writers House party with my boy David Arnold and L.A. Mom Holly Goldberg Sloan!

Writers House party with my boy David Arnold and L.A. Mom Holly Goldberg Sloan!

Link 6 Sep 148 notes Necessary Lesbianism»

robintalley:

I’m still furious about yesterday’s “unnecessary lesbianism” thing (http://lbardugo.tumblr.com/post/96721161255/ms-bardugo-i-loved-your-first-books-but-i-was) makes me insane. Here’s why:

Being gay isn’t a political statement. It isn’t a point of view. It isn’t about being “politically…

Text 6 Sep 4,345 notes

Anonymous said: Ms. Bardugo, I loved your first books, but I was terribly disappointed to see you give in to political correctness in Ruin & Rising. You had a great story and then you ruined it with unnecessary lesbianism. Authors don't need to make statements, they just need to write good books. I hope you'll remember that in the future.

lbardugo:

I was really tempted to ignore this because I don’t believe in giving anon wangs a platform, but the term “unnecessary lesbianism” made me laugh so hard that I caved.

Authors can write good books and make statements. I’m going to make some statements now. (Get ready.)

Queer people and queer relationships aren’t less necessary to narrative than cishet people or relationships. In fact, given the lovely emails and messages I’ve received about Tamar and Nadia (and given the existence of anon wangs like you), I’d say making queer relationships visible in young adult fiction is an excellent—and yes, necessary—idea.

I do agree that story trumps statement or we’d all just write angry pamphlets, but queer people exist both in my world and the world of the Grisha trilogy. I don’t see how including them in my work is making a statement unless that statement is “I won’t willfully ignore or exclude people in order to make a few anon wangs happy.” If that’s the statement I’m making, I’m totally down with it.

Also, I’m going to take this moment to shout out Malinda Lo, Laura Lam, Alex London, David Levithan, Emily Danforth, Emma Trevayne, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, and Cassandra Clare, and to link to Malinda’s 2013 guide to LGBT in YA.  Because why just give attention to bigots when you can talk about awesome books and authors instead?


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